The Pivot to Asia: U.S. Defense Strategy

May 15, 2014

Rear Admiral (ret.) Alexander MillerRear Admiral (ret.) Alexander Miller

Following a decade of intense focus on the Middle East and Southwest Asia, the Obama administration in 2011 initiated what it called a “pivot” to Asia: a shift in strategy aimed at bolstering the United States’ defense ties with countries throughout the region and expanding the U.S. military presence there. With this pivot, the United States government is gradually reorienting elements of its foreign policy towards the Asia-Pacific region.

The pivot or rebalancing is premised on the recognition of the importance of the Asia-Pacific region to the United States. Meanwhile, Asian nations are trying to discern the goals of the pivot in terms of U.S. defense strategy. Is it aimed at fostering cooperation in the region or does it presuppose that competition, or even conflict, is inevitable? Join special guest Rear Admiral (ret.) Alex Miller for his view of what the “pivot” means for the military and for U.S. interests.

Rear Admiral Miller retired from the U.S. Navy after a 33-year career in intelligence. In his final tour of duty, he was the Chief of Staff, post 9/11, of the National Security Agency. His career also included command of Navy intelligence organizations in Greece and Japan and duty as the Deputy Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence, U.S. Pacific Command. He also served as Space and Electronic Warfare Officer, U.S. Sixth Fleet, and aboard ships, submarines, and reconnaissance aircraft operating in the Pacific, Atlantic, Indian Oceans and the Mediterranean Sea.

Today, he is a director at Deloitte Consulting LLP. Previously, he was senior vice president and general manager at L-3 Communications, managing “L”-3 service business in the DOD and intelligence community.

Rear Admiral Miller (ret.) is appearing in a private capacity. His comments do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. government or of Deloitte.

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